Monday, May 17, 2021

Contribution of Dependency Theorist to explain unequal economic systems

 Contribution of Dependency Theorist to explain unequal economic systems

Dependency theory is the notion that resources flow from a "periphery" of poor and underdeveloped states to a "core" of wealthy states, enriching the latter at the expense of the former. It is a central contention of dependency theory that poor states are impoverished and rich ones enriched by the way poor states are integrated into the "world system". This theory was officially developed in the late 1960s following World War II, as scholars searched for the root issue in the lack of development in Latin America.

The theory arose as a reaction to modernization theory, an earlier theory of development which held that all societies progress through similar stages of development, that today's underdeveloped areas are thus in a similar situation to that of today's developed areas at some time in the past, and that, therefore, the task of helping the underdeveloped areas out of poverty is to accelerate them along this supposed common path of development, by various means such as investment, technology transfers, and closer integration into the world market. Dependency theory rejected this view, arguing that underdeveloped countries are not merely primitive versions of developed countries, but have unique features and structures of their own; and, importantly, are in the situation of being the weaker members in a world market economy.

Income inequality, in economics, significant disparity in the distribution of income between individuals, groups, populations, social classes, or countries. Income inequality is a major dimension of social stratification and social class. It affects and is affected by many other forms of inequality, such as inequalities of wealth, political power, and social status. Income is a major determinant of quality of life, affecting the health and well-being of individuals and families, and varies by social factors such as sex, age, and race or ethnicity.

On a global level, income inequality is extreme by any measure, with the richest 1 percent of people in the world receiving as much as the bottom 56 percent in the early 21st century. Within the United States, income inequality is much greater than in most other developed countries. In 2014, the richest 1 percent received 22 percent of total income, and the top 10 percent of U.S. households received about 60 percent of total income. 

Kinds Of Income Inequality : One’s occupation is a central basis for differences in income for most people. In more-developed countries such as the United States, wages and salaries are the major source of income for most households, while property, including capital gains, is the major source for the most affluent. Income inequality can be studied within countries, between countries, or across the world’s population without regard to national boundaries.
 

The theory arose as a reaction to modernization theory, an earlier theory of development which held that all societies progress through similar stages of development, that today's underdeveloped areas are thus in a similar situation to that of today's developed areas at some time in the past, and that, therefore, the task of helping the underdeveloped areas out of poverty is to accelerate them along this supposed common path of development, by various means such as investment, technology transfers, and closer integration into the world market. Dependency theory rejected this view, arguing that underdeveloped countries are not merely primitive versions of developed countries, but have unique features and structures of their own; and, importantly, are in the situation of being the weaker members in a world market economy.

Income inequality, in economics, significant disparity in the distribution of income between individuals, groups, populations, social classes, or countries. Income inequality is a major dimension of social stratification and social class. It affects and is affected by many other forms of inequality, such as inequalities of wealth, political power, and social status. Income is a major determinant of quality of life, affecting the health and well-being of individuals and families, and varies by social factors such as sex, age, and race or ethnicity. 

Despite popular belief that income inequality largely reflects individual differences in talent and motivation, there are also significant structural and cultural causes, such as segmented labour markets, discrimination, institutionalized racism and sexism, gender roles, and family responsibilities. Other legal, political, and economic factors—such as corporate power, degree of private versus public (or common) ownership and control of resources, collective-bargaining frameworks, and minimum-wage laws—also affect income levels independently of individual traits. Income inequalities can have different implications for levels of well-being in different countries, depending on whether other basic needs such as housing, health care, and food are largely market-based and on whether people have access to productive resources such as land, water, and technology.

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