Friday, October 2, 2020

The learning processes identified by Piaget

 The learning processes identified by Piaget

The learning processes identified by Piaget, Cognition refers to thinking and memory processes, and cognitive development refers to long-term changes in these processes. one among the foremost widely known perspectives about cognitive development is that the cognitive stage theory of a Swiss psychologist named Piaget . The learning processes identified by Piaget, Piaget created and studied an account of how children and youth gradually become ready to think logically and scientifically. The learning processes identified by Piaget, Because his theory is particularly popular among educators, we specialise in it during this chapter.

The learning processes identified by Piaget; ignou bes solved assignment; learning and teaching


Piaget was a psychological constructivist: in his view, learning proceeded by the interplay of assimilation (adjusting new experiences to suit prior concepts) and accommodation (adjusting concepts to suit new experiences). The learning processes identified by Piaget, The to-and-fro of those two processes leads not only to short-term learning, but also to long-term developmental change. The long-term developments are really the most focus of Piaget’s cognitive theory.

After observing children closely, Piaget proposed that cognition developed through distinct stages from birth through the top of adolescence. The learning processes identified by Piaget, By stages he meant a sequence of thinking patterns with four key features:

They always happen within the same order.

• No stage is ever skipped.

• Each stage may be a significant transformation of the stage before it.

• Each later stage incorporated the sooner stages into itself.

Basically this is often the “staircase” model of development mentioned at the start of this chapter. Piaget proposed four major stages of cognitive development, and called them

(1) sensorimotor intelligence,

(2) preoperational thinking,

(3) concrete operational thinking, and

(4) formal operational thinking.

Each stage is correlated with an age period of childhood, but only approximately.

The sensorimotor stage: birth to age 2

In Piaget’s theory, the sensorimotor stage is first, and is defined because the period when infants “think” by means of their senses and motor actions. The learning processes identified by Piaget, As every new parent will attest, infants continually touch, manipulate, look, listen to, and even bite and chew objects. consistent with Piaget, these actions allow them to find out about the planet and are crucial to their early cognitive development.

The infant’s actions allow the kid to represent (or construct simple concepts of) objects and events. The learning processes identified by Piaget, A toy animal could also be just a confusing array of sensations initially , but by looking, feeling, and manipulating it repeatedly, the kid gradually organizes her sensations and actions into a stable concept, toy animal. The representation acquires a permanence lacking within the individual experiences of the thing , which are constantly changing. The learning processes identified by Piaget, Because the representation is stable, the kid “knows,” or a minimum of believes, that toy animal exists albeit the particular toy animal is temporarily out of sight. Piaget called this sense of stability object permanence, a belief that objects exist whether or not they're actually present. The learning processes identified by Piaget, it's a serious achievement of sensorimotor development, and marks a qualitative transformation in how older infants (24 months) believe experience compared to younger infants (6 months).

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