Thursday, September 17, 2020

The institution of marriage and the system of dowry in The Pot of Gold

 The institution of marriage and the system of dowry in The Pot of Gold

The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, Like all of Plautus’ plays, The Pot of Gold too is about in Athens. Yet, the themes and issues he highlights are Roman. His comedies are a reflection of the society of his time. The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, The characters he describes help the fashionable researcher to make an idea of the way during which society functioned in Plautus’ time. The Pot of Gold gives us an insight into Roman life at that time—especially the position of the women and slaves.

What do you understand of the institution of marriage and the system of dowry in The Pot of Gold


Lar Familiaris presents the prologue of the play, which sets the stage for the action that follows. The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, it's by Lar Familiaris that the audience is informed that Euclio’s grandfather, being a superb miser, had buried a pot of gold within the central hall of his house. The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, This wealth had remained undiscovered until Lar Familiaris, in his pity for Euclio’s impoverished condition, and his appreciation of Phaedria’s devotion, guided Euclio to the treasure.

While Euclio is preoccupied with hiding his treasure, his daughter Phaedria has been seduced by Lyconides, a youth who wishes to marry her as she is expecting their child. Oblivious to this , Euclio has accepted his neighbour Megadorus’ proposal of marriage for his daughter. The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, Megadorus happens to be Lyconides’ uncle. Lyconides confesses his love for Phaedria to her father, and while he does so, his slave steals the pot of gold.

The System Of Dowry In The Pot Of Gold, The manuscript of the play which survives contains the action only upto now . Most editors who have completed the text, including E.F.Watling, have done so from summaries that have survived or bits of dialogues which are available to them. From the summaries available to researchers, they have been able to fathom that the ending of the play is happy, with Lyconides and Phaedria marrying each other , and miserly Euclio uncharacteristically deciding to supply them the pot of gold as a wedding gift.

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