Tuesday, November 19, 2019

Meg 01 June 2019 Question Paper


JUNE 2019
MEG -1 BRITISH POETRY
Attempt all questions. Each question carries 10 marks. Explain the passages below with reference to their contexts.
Q.1 (a)  His hors were goode, but he was nat gay.Of fustian he wered a gyponAl bismotered with his habergeoun,For he was late ycome from his viage,And wente for to doon his pilgrymage.
OR


(b) Lo, swich it is for to be recchelees,And necligent, and truste on flaterye.But ye that holden this tale a folye,As of a fox, or of a cok and hen,Taketh the moralitee, good men
Q. 2 (a) Ah my deere love why doe ye sleepe thus long,
When meeter were that ye should now awake,
T’awayt the coming of your joyous make,
And hearken to the birds’ lovelearn├Ęd song,
The dewy leaves among.
OR
(b) Against the bridal day, which is not long:Sweet Thames, run softly, till I end my song
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Q. 3 (a) If they be two, they are two soAs stiff twin compasses are two;Thy soul, the fix'd foot, makes no showTo move, but doth, if th' other do.
OR
(b) “Yet let him keep the rest,But keep them with repining restlessness;Let him be rich and weary, that at least,If goodness lead him not, yet wearinessMay toss him to my breast.”
Q. 4  (a) For so the holy sages once did sing,That he our deadly forfeit should release,And with his Father work us a perpetual peace.
OR
(b) Oft in glimmering bow'rs and gladesHe met her, and in secret shadesOf woody Ida's inmost grove,While yet there was no fear of Jove...
Q. 5 (a) Some beams of wit on other souls may fall,       
Strike through and make a lucid interval;
But Shadwell’s genuine night admits no ray,       
His rising fogs prevail upon the day.
OR
(b) As yet a child, nor yet a fool to fame,
I lisp'd in numbers, for the numbers came.I left no calling for this idle trade,No duty broke, no father disobey'd.
Q. 6 (a) Nor will it seem to thee, my Friend! so promptIn sympathy, that I have lengthen'd out,With fond and feeble tongue, a tedious tale.
OR
(b) Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,For he on honey-dew hath fed,And drunk the milk of Paradise.
Q. 7 (a)"First who art thou?" . . . "Before thy memory
"I feared, loved, hated, suffered, did, & died,And if the spark with which Heaven lit my spiritEarth had with purer nutriment supplied"Corruption would not now thus much inheritOf what was once Rousseau
OR
(b)Upon the sodden groundHis old right hand lay nerveless, listless, dead,Unsceptred; and his realmless eyes were closed;
Q. 8 (a) The white-grape vineyard where the oil-press stood,Drop water gently till the surface sinks,And if ye find...ah God, I know not, I!...
OR
(b)Yet each man kills the thing he loves By each let this be heard,Some do it with a bitter look, Some with a flattering word,The coward does it with a kiss, The brave man with a sword!
Q. 9 (a) Though Hamlet rambles and Lear rages,And all the drop scenes drop at onceUpon a hundred thousand stages,It cannot grow by an inch or an ounce.
OR
(b) The hot water at ten.And if it rains, a closed car at four.And we shall play a game of chess,Pressing lidless eyes and waiting for a knock upon the door.
Q. 10 (a) The force that through the green fuse drives the flowerDrives my green age; that blasts the roots of treesIs my destroyer.And I am dumb to tell the crooked roseMy youth is bent by the same wintry fever
OR
(b) Ah, were I courageous enoughTo shout Stuff your pension!But I know, all too well, that's the stuffThat dreams are made on:

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