The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation   

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation  - In this post you will get all the information about ‘The Year of the Runaways’. The proper and easy explanation of the novel is written below, i hope will read the summary and know everything about The Year of the Runaways’. The Year of the Runaways tells of the bold dreams and daily struggles of an unlikely family thrown together by circumstance. Thirteen young men live in a house in Sheffield, each in flight from India and in desperate search of a new life. Their biggest concern is an immigration raid, and what they’ll do if they’re caught. They try to stay under the radar, working in menial jobs, such as sewer maintenance and food service, so no one notices them. Their main fear is going to back to the misery they left behind in India. We learn about each of their histories in turn through flashbacks.

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Introduction

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - The Year of the Runaways is the second novel by British author Sunjeev Sahota. Published in June 2015, it was shortlisted for the 2015 Man Booker Prize and was awarded with a European Union Prize for Literature in 2017 (for the UK).

The Year of the Runaways tells of the bold dreams and daily struggles of an unlikely family thrown together by circumstance. Thirteen young men live in a house in Sheffield, each in flight from India and in desperate search of a new life. Tarlochan, a former rickshaw driver, will say nothing about his past in Bihar; and Avtar has a secret that binds him to protect the chaotic Randeep. Randeep, in turn, has a visa-wife in a flat on the other side of town: a clever, devout woman whose cupboards are full of her husband's clothes, in case the immigration men surprise her with a call.

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - The novel focuses on the experiences of migrant workers in Britain. A critic for the Indian Express notes that "the novel tunnels through news headlines of immigration and caste debates" in a way that is "one of its transcendent strengths". The Telegraph commented that "the novel feels like a work of social protest" with "enough fine drawing of human foibles, of different idioms and of modern British life to fill up several lesser novels."

In 2020, Emma Lee-Potter of The Independent listed The Year of the Runaways as one of the 12 best Indian novels. The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation , The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary.

About the Author

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - Sunjeev Sahota FRSL (born 1981) is a British novelist whose first novel, Ours are the Streets, was published in January 2011 and whose second novel, The Year of the Runaways, was shortlisted for the 2015 Man Booker Prize and was awarded a European Union Prize for Literature in 2017.

Sahota was born in 1981 in Derby, and his family moved to Chesterfield when he was seven years old. His paternal grandparents had emigrated to Britain from Punjab in 1966. After finishing school, Sahota studied mathematics at Imperial College London. As of January 2011, he was working in marketing for the insurance company Aviva.

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - Sahota had not read a novel until he was 18 years old, when he read Salman Rushdie's Midnight's Children while visiting relatives in India before starting university. He bought the book in the airport before flying to India. The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary - While he had studied English literature at GCSE level, the course did not require students to read a novel:

· We had to do a Shakespeare, and we did Macbeth. We had to do a pre 20th-century text, and we did a play, She Stoops to Conquer. We had to do poetry and we did Yevgeny Yevtushenko. But no novels.

·After Midnight's Children, Sahota went on to read The God of Small ThingsA Suitable Boy and The Remains of the Day. In an interview in January 2011, he stated:

·It was like I was making up for lost time – not that I had to catch up, but it was as though I couldn't quite believe this world of storytelling I had found and I wanted to get as much of it down me as I possibly could.

·In 2013 he was included in a Granta list of 20 best young writers, released 20 years after the magazine first published such a list.

·In June 2018 Sahota was elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature in its "40 Under 40" initiative.

·In 2019, Sahota started teaching creative writing to undergraduates at Durham University, where he is Assistant Professor.

Works

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation  - Sahota's first novel, Ours are the Streets, was published in January 2011 by Picador. He wrote the book in the evenings and at weekends because of his day job. The novel tells the story of a British Pakistani youth who becomes a suicide bomber. Sahota was prompted to start writing the book by the 7 July 2005 London bombings. According to the Sheffield Telegraph, the book is "being mentioned in literary supplements as one of the novels to look out for in 2011". Ours are the Streets has been reviewed in a number of national newspapers, including The TimesThe GuardianThe Independent and The Sunday Times.

His second novel, The Year of the Runaways, about the experience of illegal immigrants in Britain, was published in June 2015 and was shortlisted for the 2015 Man Booker Prize.

China Room was published in 2021. It interweaves the stories of a child bride living in a village in 1920s Punjab and her British-born and raised great-grandson, who returns to the village in 1999. The novel was longlisted for the 2021 Booker Prize.

Summary

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - In the first half, the book alternates between shorter chapters about the four characters in Sheffield, and novella-length sections about each of them prior to their arrival there. It is a risky strategy – if just one of the sections sags by comparison with the others the whole structure could collapse – but Sahota is more than equal to the task. 

The first story is that of Tochi, a chamar or “untouchable” in an India of heightened Hindu nationalism where a man risks everything by merely being perceived as trying to break out of the strict rules of caste. Sahota is not, however, the kind of writer who will seize on instances of the most violent forms of bigotry – throughout the novel, his eye is drawn more frequently to the smaller moments of injustice that wear people down and also the acts of grace that they can barely believe possible.

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation - Tochi’s story allows us to understand why he holds himself separate from the other men with whom he lives and works in Sheffield, and the following novella-length section bringing together the tales of Avtar and Randeep reveals why their relationship is caught somewhere between acquaintances and friends. Former neighbours, whose lives in the world of the middle class in India prove to be precarious, they are propelled, respectively, by love and shame to travel to England in search of work. 

The final story is that of Narindar, a devout British Sikh woman for whom goodness is at the heart of religious practice. But what does it mean to be good in an unjust world? What is a devoted daughter to do when her idea of what is moral runs counter to her family’s notions of honour? What is a law-abiding British woman to do when what she believes to be the path to virtue runs counter to the law? The question of the responsibilities borne by the citizens of the more fortunate nations of the world towards those from other countries is at the heart of Narindar’s story, but it is told in the most intimate of ways, as an issue that is not theorised but deeply felt. And the question remains open all the way to the end.

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota - The second half of the novel moves forward, as the characters’ relationships with each other grow more tangled, and their situations more fraught. Tabloid phrases such as “scam marriages”, “illegal workers”, “abuse of student visas” are placed within the context of lives filled with love and desperation. Yet the book should not be read for its worthiness rather than for its literary qualities. Sahota is a writer who knows how to turn a phrase, how to light up a scene, how to make you stay up late at night to learn what happens next. 

This is a novel that takes on the largest questions and still shines in its smallest details – an encounter between a lonely old Englishman and the Indian boy from a call centre whom he befriends over the phone, never dreaming the boy might arrive at his doorstep; the misunderstanding of a woman who thinks a man is deliberately snubbing her when the reality is that he is unable to read the messages she leaves for him; the impossibility of friendship between young men who know there are too few scraps to go around and too many dependants relying on them to be the ones to grab hold of the scraps.

The Year of the Runaways By Sunjeev Sahota Plot Summary , Introduction , About the Author and Explanation  - Through these stories and others, Sahota moves some of the most urgent political questions of the day away from rhetorical posturing and contested statistics into the realm of humanity. The Year of the Runaways is a brilliant and beautiful novel.

Reference

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The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - In this post you will get all the information about ‘The Devil's Wind’. The proper and easy explanation of the novel is written below, i hope will read the summary and know everything about ‘The Devil's Wind ’. The Devil’s Wind is Manohar Malgonkar’s sixth novel. He calls it Nana Saheb’s story, and justifiably so, because it is more the story of Nana Saheb the last Peshwa than of the Mutiny of 1857. In the “Author’s Note” Malgonkar points out, “This ambiguous man and his fate have always fascinated me. I found thate d stories of Nana and d revolt have never been told from the Indian point of viewa. This, then, is Nana’s story as I believe he might have written it'himself. It is fiction;but it takes no liberties with verifiable facts or even with probabilities.”

distant drum by manohar malgonkar summary manohar malgonkar is a an writer devil wind meaning manohar malgonkar pdf books by manohar malgonkar manohar malgonkar ka jivani hush by manohar malgonkar manohar malgonkar pronunciation

Introduction

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - The Devil's Wind is a historical novel by Manohar Malgonkar that tells the story of Nana Saheb, the heir of the last Peshwa of the Maratha Confederacy, who played a leading role in the 1857 War of Independence. It provides a sympathetic portrait of a man whom the British portrayed as a great villain, and is based on historical sources as far as possible. The book is written as an autobiography in which Nana Saheb describes his life in his own words. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

About the Author

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - Manohar Malgonkar was an Indian author of both fiction and nonfiction in the English language. He was also an army officer, a big game hunter, a civil servant, a mine owner and a farmer.

Malgonkar was born in Jagalbet village Karwar dist, near Londa in Belgaum district. From his maternal side, his great-grandfather had been governor of Gwalior State. He began his education in Belgaum. He later attended school in Dharwad and graduated from Mumbai University. After, he joined the army and rose to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel in the Maratha Light Infantry. He retired from service at the age of 39. He also stood for parliament.

Manohar Malgonkar (1913-2010) occupies an important place in the canons of Indian literature in English, particularly for his historical fiction with political undertones. History was his forte but he was a writer and artist first and as such artistic integrity coupled with depth of historical sense make the works interesting and authentic. Born on July 12, 1913 near Belgaum, Manohar Malgonkar was the grandson of the Prime Minister of a former princely state of Dewas.  The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation , The Malgonkars were close to the rulers of Dewas and young Manohar got an opportunity to experience life in the royal households closely which is reflected in The Princes and The Devil’s Winds. Often acclaimed as a master story-teller for his narrative skill, Malgonkar has the uncanny knack of transmuting his felt experience into an artistic piece. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation , The corpus of his work is rich with eleven novels that have a blend of history, romance and military life, two light romances/thrillers, a detective novel, a play, innumerable essays/ articles, two historical accounts, a travelogue and a large number of short stories collected in several anthologies. Indeed, his works are as varied and colourful as was his life–a stint in the army, a time spent as a big game hunter, a miner, a tea garden manager and an adventurer. 

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - Most of that activity was during the build-up to Indian independence and its aftermath, often the settings for his works. The socio-historical milieux of those times form the backdrop of his novels, which are usually of action and adventure. He also wrote non-fiction, including biography and history.

Malgonkar lived in a remote bungalow called 'Burbusa Bungalow' located at Jagalbet in Joida Taluk in Uttara Kannada DistrictKarnataka. His only child Suneeta, who was educated at the famous Lawrence School, Sanawar, died in 1998.

Manohar Malgonkar is clear about his priorities. Metaphysics does not interest him nor does psychology appeal to him. Psychological novels like those of Virginia Woolf and James Joyce and nearer home of Anita Desai and Arun Joshi are not his cup of tea. He is a story-teller who identifi es with plot, action, characterization and dramatization than with the whimsicality of the mind. “I do strive deliberately and hard to tell a story well…”, he says. 

    The psychological novel with its “interminable ramblings about the day in the life of someone or other” does not appeal to him. Scoffi ng at it he equates it with “counting veins in every leaf of cabbage.” Yet, his novels have strong individualized characters who can be studied from the angle of psychology. Characters like Hiroji, Abhayraj, Debi Dayal, Aslam Chisti and Henry Winton are not abstractions meant to serve a thesis but human beings with a motivational system, moving within the conceptual system of their time; they are human beings with goodness or meanness, contradiction or unpredictability. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

    Many a critic avers that Malgonkar analyses his characters with the detachment of a historian and draws “faceless” and “conventional” characters; they fail to emerge as living human beings; have no conviction of their own, nor do they affi rm their identity. My contention is, however, to the contrary

Works

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - For many years, Malgonkar wrote a weekly column covering a wide range of topics, which was published in Indian newspapers like The Statesman and Deccan Herald. Most of his books were published in India by Orient Paperbacks or by Rupa Paperbacks. Th e novel beautifully blends facts and fi ction, art and history to create a character who is generous, noble, understanding and aff ectionate but weak, albeit, unwilling to shed blood. In his ‘Author’s Note’ Malgonkar says, “Th is ambiguous man and his fate have always fascinated me. I discovered that the stories of Nana and the revolt have never been told from the Indian point of view. Th is, then, is Nana’s story as I believe he might have written it himself. It is fi ction; but it takes no liberties with verifi able facts or even possibilities.

Distant Drum, his first novel is a military novel. It was published in 1960 when Manohar Malgonkar was 47, and the experiences of army life and the soldiers’ espirit de corps were fresh in memory. Understandably, the novel throbs with a mood of musing over, of recall, though certainly not of nostalgia. It is motivated by the martial code that is in the blood of every soldier. Honesty, integrity, loyalty to duty and discipline form its core. Religious and communal tensions fade away when Kiran Garud, the protagonist, and Abdulla Jamal, his friend help each other and each saves the other’s life on diff erent occasions. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

The Princes, his third novel, has been hailed as an epic saga of our contemporary history. It is about the princes who were on the verge of losing their roots; and it takes up the ticklish question of their identity. Malgonkar shows remarkable ability to present an insider’s view of princely life.


Novels

·         The Sea Hawk: Life and Battles of Kanhoji Angrey (1959)

·         Distant Drum (1960)

·         A Combat of Shadows (1962)

·         The Princes (1963)

·         A Bend in the Ganges (1964)

·         Spy in Amber (1971)

·         The Devil’s Wind (on the life on Peshwa Nana Sahib) (1972)

·         Shalimar (1978) [Novelization of the film Shalimar]

·         Bandicoot Run (1982)

Summary

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - Nana Saheb was the adopted son of Bajirao II, the last Maratha Peshwa, and heir to his position as "prime minister" of the Maratha lands. He is raised in an immensely wealthy family and educated as a Brahmin and a prince, although his father's power had been taken away by the British. On his father's death the British do not recognize his title, but allow him to continue in his comfortable exile in the town of Bithoor. An urbane and sophisticated man, Nana Saheb is sympathetic to the British, several of whom are his close friends, but cannot accept their right to rule and exploit India.

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - When the mutiny breaks out in May 1857, Nana Sahib finds himself forced to accept a position of leadership. After a long and ultimately futile struggle in which both sides commit many atrocities, Nana Sahib flees to Nepal where he receives a grudging sanctuary, taking with him an English woman he has rescued and with whom he has fallen in love. Many years later, he revisits India and then travels on to safety in Istanbul, the place where he sets down his memoirs. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

Malgonkar samples three western views as ‘Prolegomena’ to substantiate his statement. Th e British view of Indian ‘mutiny’ (for us it is our First War of Independence) given by A. Miles and A. Pattle in 1885 says, “Few names are more conspicuous in the annals of crime than that of Nana Saheb, who achieved an immortality of infamy by his perfi dy and cruelty at Cawnpore.” Th e French records make him a man-eating monster who “had a roasted English child brought in occasionally on a pike for him to examine with his pince-nez.” 

    The American view refers to, “Nana Saheb massacring entire British colony at Cawnpore.” On the contrary, in India, he became a revered fi gure; “parents privately warned their children not to believe the history taught in schools” and in villages folk songs and ballads were composed extolling him as a patriot.

Th e Novel is divided in three parts: ‘Bithoor’, ‘Kanpur’ and ‘Gone Away’. Within this framework, the author presents the course of events that ultimately led to Nana’s defeat and escape, the end of East India Company’s rule and the promulgation of the British Queen’s rule. Th e fi rst two parts deal intensively with documented history, while in the last part (Part III) Nana Saheb Peshwa’s present is seen in the light of his past.

    The history of the Revolt starts with the widespread discontent and distrust of the British — their behavior and policies. The British stratagem to exploit Indians was well-planned and calculated. Dalhousie’s The Doctrine of Lapse came as a great shock to the rulers; the farmers and taluqdars were unhappy with land reforms, the people saw socio-cultural reforms as interference in their traditional ways of living and were afraid of conversion to Christianity; the Sepoys were apprehensive of animal fat on cartridges. In brief, the discontent could be seen in all sections of the society: the nobility, who dreaded the Doctrine of Lapse; the taluqdars, who had lost their land to farmers as the result of land reforms and the masses who feared conversion. Things took a grim turn when Oudh (Avadh) was annexed and its treasure was looted with impunity.

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Major themes

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - The Devil's Wind is a painstaking literary work that blends beautifully the artist and the historian. The book is both an epic and an autobiography. Malgonkar's purpose is to rehabilitate Nana Saheb, maligned as a monster by British propaganda, by telling the story from the Indian point of view in Nana Saheb own words. Malgonkar's Nana Sahib is an affectionate, soft-hearted, generous and cultivated nobleman, free from prejudice and governed by common sense and reason. The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar Novel Summary , Introduction , About the Author & Explanation

With skill and reticence, Malgomkar reconstructs the picture of India, with Kanpur as its microcosm, growing suspicious, aggrieved, alienated, hostile, rebellious, enraged and vengeful by degrees. He presents a convincing picture of the Indian reaction to British provocations, describes their hesitance and disunity at the time of the early "rebel" victories, and their growing determination mingled with despair as the tide turns against them.

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - Nana Saheb inherits from his adoptive father a delight in sex, and this theme recurs throughout the book. Malgonkar treats the women in his book sympathetically, and grants their right to sexual choice. The book gives a powerful portrayal of Kashi, Nana Sahib's third wife, who remains a virgin while with him because of his fear of a curse that says if he consummates a marriage the wife shall die, which had happened with his first two wives. Later, Kashi gains her freedom to love as she chooses in the court of Nepal.

Explanation of the novel's title

The Devil's Wind By Manohar Malgonkar - "The Devils Wind" is the name the sepoys gave to the mutiny, a barbaric, uncontrollable fury that swept across the hot plains of India as if blown by the Devil. It is another name for the Loo, the hot dry and gritty wind that blows in the plains of India before the monsoons bring relief. The protagonist's uncle was murdered by his own relatives for acquiring the throne. He haunts the subsequent rulers of the Maratha kingdom. Nanasaheb's predicament is this devil's wind and that explains the title, Devil's Wind.

 Reference

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The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan Plot Summary , Characters and Full Explanation

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan Plot Summary , Characters and Full Explanation

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - In this post you will get all the information about ‘The Twentieth Wife’. The proper and easy explanation of the novel is written below, i hope will read the summary and know everything about ‘The Twentieth Wife’. The Twentieth Wife is a fictionalized account about the early life of Mehrunnisa, a Persian refugee who became the most famous Empress of Mughal India, through her marriage to the Emperor Jahangir. Mehrunnisa and Jahangir are enamored of each other for decades, obstacles upon obstacles throw themselves in the way–rebellions, Mehrunnisa’s mean first husband, more rebellions, and Jahangir’s scheming Empress.

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Characters

·         Abdur Rabin

·         Abul Hasan

·         Akbar

·         Ali Quli Khan Istajlu

·         Asmat

·         Ghias Beg

·         Hoshiyar Khan

·         Jagat Gosini

·         Jahangir

·         Khurram

About the Author

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Indu Sundaresan is an Indian-American author of historical fiction. She was born and raised in India as the daughter of an Indian Air Force pilot, Group Captain R. Sundaresan, who died in a crash while on duty. Her mother's name is Madhuram Sundaresan. The family then moved to Bangalore, where she collected books eagerly. She then migrated to the United States for graduate studies at the University of Delaware. She has an MS in operations research and an MA in economics. She is married and lives in Seattle, Washington with her husband and daughter.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Her first novel The Twentieth Wife is about how a young widow named Mehrunissa, daughter of Persian refugees and wife of an Afghan commander, becomes Empress of the Mughal Empire under the name of Nur Jahan.

Her second novel The Feast of Roses is the sequel to The Twentieth Wife and focuses on Nur Jahan exerting authority granted by her husband Jahangir during the sixteen years of her marriage to the emperor.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Shadow Princess is the third novel in the Taj trilogy set after the succession of Shahjahan (Prince Khurram) whose chief queen Mumtaz Mahal dies in childbirth and then their daughter, Jahanara takes centre stage in the politics of the court.

She is also the author of The Splendor of Silence, historical fiction set in a fictional Indian princely state just before Indian independence in 1947. Her work has been translated into some 23 languages worldwide.

Summary

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - The first book in the Taj Mahal trilogy, The Twentieth Wife (2002), Indu Sundaresan’s debut work of romantic historical fiction, tells the story of one of India’s most controversial and brilliant empresses, who almost single-handedly shaped the future of the Mughal Empire. Winner of the 2003 Washington State Book Award, it received overwhelmingly positive reviews following its publication. The author of numerous historical books, Sundaresan studied economics in India and attended graduate school at the University of Delaware.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - The Story begins with The city was celebrating. Prince Salim, Akbar’s eldest son and heir apparent, was to be married in three days, on February 13, 1585. Salim was the first of the three royal princes to wed, and no amount of the unseasonable heat or dust or noise would keep the people of Lahore from the bazaar today  The Twentieth Wife is set in late sixteenth-century India. The protagonist Mehrunnisa is born in 1577 on the road from Persia to India. Her parents, Persian refugees, are fleeing starvation, poverty, and brutality; they can’t afford to look after another child. They consider keeping Mehrunnisa but they don’t want to get attached to her. Instead, they abandon her at the roadside and take off with their other children.

Instead of leaving Mehrunnisa to die, the gods of fate have other plans. Mehrunnisa is found by royal attendants who are struck by her infant beauty and good nature. The attendants take her to the court of Emperor Akbar, where Akbar falls in love with the baby’s dazzling grace. He agrees that she can stay at court and his first wife, Ruqayya, will raise her.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Mehrunnisa grows up in Akbar’s court under the watchful eye of her royal patrons. Akbar ensures she has a thorough education and she learns everything from Persian to Arabic. She is intimidating, yet an alluring child, and Ruqayya dotes on her. As she grows into a beautiful young woman, soldiers across the empire want to marry her. A bright future seems inevitable for Mehrunnisa.

Although Mehrunnisa is only a commoner, she sets her sights on a very important bachelor—Prince Salim, also known as Jahangir. Akbar’s first son and heir, he is supposed to marry a Rajput princess Man Bai. Jahangir’s engagement doesn’t deter Mehrunnisa because she knows that an emperor is expected to take many wives. Akbar, however, arranges a different marriage for Mehrunnisa.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Akbar promises Mehrunnisa to Ali Quli, who is older, greedy, and deceitful. Mehrunnisa doesn’t want to marry him although she knows there isn’t a choice. She owes Akbar everything and cannot betray the love he has shown her. When Akbar dies and Jahangir takes the throne, Mehrunnisa quietly prays for the day when Jahangir will notice her. The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan Plot Summary , Characters and Full Explanation 

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Before long, Mehrunnisa has bigger problems than unrequited love. Ali Quli plots treason against Jahangir and is executed. His crimes place Mehrunnisa under the spotlight for a while, and she does everything she can to prove her innocence to stay alive. By the time Ali Quli dies, Jahangir has nineteen wives; he is looking for another one to add to his collection. This, Mehrunnisa hopes, is the opportunity she has been waiting for.

Mehrunnisa goes all-out to attract Jahangir’s attention. She spills wine on him one evening, giving her a chance to talk to him. Jahangir is attracted to her and wants her in his harem. Mehrunnisa won’t sleep with him, refusing to be a concubine. Maddened by lust, Jahangir proposes to her.

Mehrunnisa becomes his twentieth and final wife. Jahangir names her Nur Jahan, or “Light of the World.” No one can believe that a Persian refugee’s child now sits alongside the Mughal Emperor. Instead of marrying a powerful and influential woman for political gain, Jahangir has married a commoner. For Mehrunnisa, it is like something out of a fairy tale.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - The fairy tale can’t last forever, as Mehrunnisa finds out. While Ali Quli cheated on her with numerous women, none of whom he married, Jahangir places each of his other wives above her. As the twentieth wife, she is the lowest-ranking woman in Jahangir’s life. To make matters worse, he is addicted to alcohol and opiates, and Mehrunnisa rarely sees him coherent and sober. This is not the life Mehrunnisa spent so many years hoping for.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Mehrunnisa decides that there is only one path open to her. She must become the most important wife and make Jahangir change his drunken ways. Usurping the other women is no easy task, however. Every woman in the royal court wants to be the most important wife, and Mehrunnisa has no one she can trust. She must plot her ascension carefully.

The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan - Ruqayya is Mehrunnisa’s best shot at an ally. Ever since Akbar’s death, Ruqayya has struggled to retain her influence over the royal women. Jagat Gosini, Jahangir’s first wife and Empress, is slowly pushing Ruqayya out of favor. Mehrunnisa clings to Ruqayya for moral support, and Ruqayya, in turn, promotes Mehrunnisa’s interests over Jagat Gosini’s. The Twentieth Wife By Indu Sundaresan Plot Summary , Characters and Full Explanation 

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